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Our GIT IT! Content for March 8, 2019

This week, our GIT IT content is a video of an independently organized TED talk on the topic of “How to Draw to Remember More.” If you can, make sure you have a pad and pen (or pencil) before you watch so that you can follow along with the presenter and complete the activity he presents. Even if you don’t actually engage in the activity, after you watch it, please comment on it in the comment area. It would be WONDERFUL to capture everyone’s thoughts about this video, particularly from the standpoint of our New Thought practices. What say you? Let’s get a discussion going! 

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5 Comments

  1. Linda R Keith

    This reminded me of a class I just took. people might not remember every word. but they remembered the drawing used to illustrate what was being said. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  2. Kathryn

    Very interesting! I’m going to try this to help with things to do. When I was younger, I never needed “to do” lists. Now I have pages of “to do” lists. But what good is such a list if you don’t look at it! 😂

    Also I like the way he helps people to reframe “drawing” in their mind as a tool. Used in this context, the key is not to be a “Rubens” or a “Picasso.” Just to be good enough for yourself!

    Here’s l👀king forward to next week’s GIT IT!
    (Uh huh… that’s my sister! So resourceful! Whoop,whoop! 🤗)

    Reply
  3. Darlene

    Very interesting. And fun. Wasn’t aware of this method. Will definitely try to incorporate this into my learning process.

    Reply
  4. Bernette Jones

    Very interesting, delightful and informative. Could not determine how it relates to anything we are currently doing at OGOT. One statement he made did accord with our teachings. We think in pictures not in words. Since we say, change your thinking and you can change your life; now we can say change your pictures and you can change your thinking and your life. Just a thought! For instance…I thought I could not draw. now I know that was just a thought. As soon as I saw one of the pictures that I drew in this exercise, I knew I could draw. Thanks for this. It was very engaging.

    Reply
    • Karen Clay

      For me that was the point though not explicit: this was a strategy that changed the way I thought about about taking in information and really brought home the adage of “a picture is worth a thousand words.” The other piece for me was the demonstration. He guided everyone through an individual demonstration of two things: each of us can draw and each of us can remember more than we think we can, even if we didn’t actually take pen to paper.

      Reply

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